24 4 / 2014

"We do not escape into philosophy, psychology, and art—we go there to restore our shattered selves into whole ones."

The New Woman,
Anais Nin (via onlylivinggirlinla)

23 4 / 2014

explore-blog:

Picasso’s 1931 illustrations for a Balzac short story - the best thing since the iconic artist’s rare 1934 etchings for a naughty ancient Greek comedy. 
For more exquisite cross-pollination of literature and art, see Salvador Dalí’s drawings for Don Quixote and Henri Matisse’s etchings for Ulysses. 

explore-blog:

Picasso’s 1931 illustrations for a Balzac short story - the best thing since the iconic artist’s rare 1934 etchings for a naughty ancient Greek comedy

For more exquisite cross-pollination of literature and art, see Salvador Dalí’s drawings for Don Quixote and Henri Matisse’s etchings for Ulysses

(Source: )

22 4 / 2014

tierradentro:

Detail from Caravaggio’s “The Incredulity of St. Thomas”, c. 1601-02.

tierradentro:

Detail from Caravaggio’s “The Incredulity of St. Thomas”, c. 1601-02.

(via casabet64)

21 4 / 2014

"Strange feeling that someone is looking at me. I am clear, then dim, then gone, then dim again, then clear again, and so on, back and forth, in and out of someone’s eye."

Samuel BeckettHappy Days (via robcam-wfu)

20 4 / 2014

desaparecidos:

John Cale, Lou Reed, Patti Smith & David Byrne, NYC, 1976

desaparecidos:

John Cale, Lou Reed, Patti Smith & David Byrne, NYC, 1976

19 4 / 2014

espantajerias:

Clara Rockmore y su Theremin.

espantajerias:

Clara Rockmore y su Theremin.

18 4 / 2014

manos-the-hands-of-fate:

"Down By Law" (1986)

I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.

17 4 / 2014

theparisreview:

“Like most people of my generation, I fell in love with the philosophy of existentialism. There is no particular religious tradition in my work. There is only one psychological assertion that I would insist upon. That is: the SELF takes precedence.” —Stanley ElkinTo read the full 1976 interview with the American Jewish novelist, short story writer, and essayist, click here.

theparisreview:

“Like most people of my generation, I fell in love with the philosophy of existentialism. There is no particular religious tradition in my work. There is only one psychological assertion that I would insist upon. That is: the SELF takes precedence.” —Stanley Elkin

To read the full 1976 interview with the American Jewish novelist, short story writer, and essayist, click here.

16 4 / 2014

mariamagda:

Fatoumata Diawara at Webeon Festival in Austin - 04.07.2013

Fatou is a guitarist and singer from Mali. Her show today at Webeon World Music Festival in Austin was perhaps my favorite. This woman is so talented and beautiful. At various points throughout the show she taught the audience different dance moves from Africa. Fatou also spoke on Mali and the recent religious war that’s been declared on music . She emphasized the importance of music not only to Malian culture and history but to Africa and the world, for it is “the only language that knows and teaches peace”. If you do not yet know her music go ahead and drift off with the sounds of her mesmerizing voice… 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E82BifytoYY

Here is an article from last year about Mali:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/23/mali-militants-declare-war-music

15 4 / 2014

boston:

For the rockers of the Baseball Project, it’s all about the game
The band, which plays the House of Blues Foundation Room on Saturday, writes emotionally sympathetic songs on often complex topics that revolve around the national pastime.
(RENATA STEINER)

boston:

For the rockers of the Baseball Project, it’s all about the game

The band, which plays the House of Blues Foundation Room on Saturday, writes emotionally sympathetic songs on often complex topics that revolve around the national pastime.

(RENATA STEINER)

14 4 / 2014

lostinurbanism:

A Great Day in Harlem, Art Kane (1958)

01 – Hilton Jefferson, 02 – Benny Golson, 03 – Art Farmer, 04 – Wilbur Ware, 05 – Art Blakey, 06 – Chubby Jackson, 07 – Johnny Griffin, 08 – Dickie Wells, 09 – Buck Clayton, 10 – Taft Jordan, 11 – Zutty Singleton, 12 – Red Allen, 13 – Tyree Glenn, 14 – Miff Molo, 15 – Sonny Greer, 16 – Jay C. Higginbotham, 17 – Jimmy Jones, 18 – Charles Mingus, 19 – Jo Jones, 20 – Gene Krupa, 21 – Max Kaminsky, 22 – George Wettling, 23 – Bud Freeman, 24 – Pee Wee Russell, 25 – Ernie Wilkins, 26 – Buster Bailey, 27 – Osie Johnson, 28 – Gigi Gryce, 29 – Hank Jones, 30 – Eddie Locke, 31 – Horace Silver, 32 – Luckey Roberts, 33 – Maxine Sullivan, 34 – Jimmy Rushing, 35 – Joe Thomas, 36 – Scoville Browne, 37 – Stuff Smith, 38 – Bill Crump, 39 – Coleman Hawkins, 40 – Rudy Powell, 41 – Oscar Pettiford, 42 – Sahib Shihab, 43 – Marian McPartland, 44 – Sonny Rollins, 45 – Lawrence Brown, 46 – Mary Lou Williams, 47 – Emmett Berry, 48 – Thelonius Monk, 49 – Vic Dickenson, 50 – Milt Hinton, 51 – Lester Young, 52 – Rex Stewart, 53 – J.C. Heard, 54 – Gerry Mulligan, 55 – Roy Eldgridge, 56 – Dizzy Gillespie, 57 – Count Basie.                                        

It Was A Great Day in Harlem, ‘But Where Was Miles Davis?’  

And what about John Coltrane and Billie Holiday?

13 4 / 2014

theacademy:

Marlon Brando before and after getting his make-up done to be Don Corleone in The Godfather

theacademy:

Marlon Brando before and after getting his make-up done to be Don Corleone in The Godfather

(via beat-sweet)

12 4 / 2014

Nick La Rocca - TIGER RAG

11 4 / 2014

10 4 / 2014

TEDDY WILSON - Rosetta

RECORDED IN 1934. Theodore Shaw “Teddy” Wilson (November 24, 1912 July 31, 1986) was a jazz pianist from the United States born in Austin, Texas. His sophisticated and elegant style graced the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald. He is considered one of the most influential jazz pianists of all time.Wilson studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute. After working in the Lawrence “Speed” Webb band, with Louis Armstrong and also “understudying” Earl Hines in Hines’s Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter’s Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935 he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band’s intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became the first black musician to perform in public with a previously all-white jazz group. The noted jazz writer and producer John Hammond was instrumental in getting Wilson a contract with Brunswick, starting in 1935, to record hot swing arrangements of the popular songs of the day, with the growing jukebox trade in mind. He recorded fifty hit records with various singers such as Lena Horne and Helen Ward, including many of Billie Holiday’s greatest successes. During these years he also took part in many highly regarded sessions with a wide range of important swing musicians, such as Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Red Norvo, Buck Clayton and Ben Webster. Wilson formed his own short-lived big band in 1939, then led a sextet at Cafe Society from 1940 to 1944. He was dubbed the “Marxist Mozart” by Howard “Stretch” Johnson due to his support for left-wing causes he performed in benefit concerts for The New Masses journal and for Russian War Relief, and chaired the Artists’ Committee to elect Benjamin J. Davis.[1] In the 1950s he taught at the Juilliard School. Wilson can be seen appearing as himself in the motion picture The Benny Goodman Story (1955). Wilson lived quietly in suburban Hillsdale, NJ in the 1960s and 1970s. He performed as a soloist, and with pick-up groups until the final years of his life. Teddy Wilson died on July 31, 1986.